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Looking to make the most of your open houses? The following three tips can help up your open house game.

  1. Digitize

For REALTORS® who want to enhance the Open House experience for prospects and bolster their own system for capturing leads, Open Home Pro fits the bill. An excellent alternative to paper sign-in sheets, this free download offers users the ability to create a comprehensive digital experience for prospects through sign-in forms, photo displays, customized questions, and automated thank you messages.

No more wasted time trying to decipher handwritten sign-in sheets that offer little other than a name and email. Based on your customized questions, this innovative program will send you a list of leads who don’t have an agent or have a home to sell, or who are pre-approved for a mortgage. Open Home Pro also allows users to easily export collected data to a CSV file.

  1. Deliver

Handouts make great icebreakers and takeaways at any Open House, and Realtors Property Resource® (RPR®) makes it easy to create them. The real estate data platform offers REALTORS® several customizable reports perfectly suited for Open Houses. Start by offering an RPR Property Flyer. Branded with your name and contact info, the flyer offers just enough data about the property to give clients a solid understanding of its attributes, including photos and insights on how you came to the list price via comps.

Two of RPR’s flagship reports seen frequently at Open Houses are their Neighborhood and School Reports. The Neighborhood Report presents an in-depth portrait of the people who live in a target area, in addition to key economic and quality of life indicators. The report also includes median list and sales prices, listings and sales volumes, and per square foot pricing on sold homes.

Similarly, RPR’s School Report report summarizes student populations, testing outcomes, parental reviews, and ratings about a public or private school. Must-have information for parents.

Here’s a tip: Print a few of these insightful reports to showcase on a kitchen table and when the supply dwindles, ask potential buyers for an email address. From that spot, use your tablet or phone to retrieve your saved reports from the RPR website and send it to the client in just a few quick clicks.

  1. Drip

Another radically simple idea for converting leads to clients post-Open House is to create a homes by email campaign. Here agents can send newly listed homes to prospects via an automated delivery system offered through their MLS. When a home is listed that meets your client’s specific criteria (location, square footage, number of bedrooms, price), the listing is automatically delivered to the client, complete with your personalized greeting. This type of drip campaign will keep your client in the loop and requires little to no effort on your part.

For more information, visit www.narrpr.com.

Posted on June 28, 2016 |

rookie-pic (1)Today I’m sharing an article originally posted on REM written by Joanna Dermenjian. This article explains the reality for new Realtors just starting out and the demands for any agent who wants to be successful in their new career. Enjoy!

Joanna writes:

You’ve passed your exam, signed on with a brokerage and received your license. Now, where is the instruction manual on how to be a real estate professional? There isn’t one! It’s Day 1 in your new career and you have no idea what to do, what to expect and how to get started. Here is what we have learned that you need to know:

Your first year will be very hard. If you make it through the first year and do 10 transactions, you have a chance to gain enough momentum to build a career in real estate. In the first 100 days, you need to gain traction. The clock is ticking, and the first 100 days are counting down. Get yourself one firm transaction and at least two more buyers you have already started working with in that first 100 days. There needs to be urgency in everything you do.

1. You are now a brand.

You are being watched – when you are out with friends, when you are eating in a restaurant, when you are shopping at a retailer or are receiving a service. Everywhere you go, people will start to know who are. They will watch you and listen to what you say and how you say it, even if you aren’t talking to them. Think about that.

2. You are a professional.

You want to be a very successful professional. Dress for the job. Arrive on time. Clean your car. Be organized. Be well groomed and presentable all the time, even in your leisure time. Behave.

3. You are a salesperson.

The public perception is that we sell houses, but truly we are selling ourselves. Our knowledge, our expertise, our competence. You don’t have those yet, so you have to work very hard to get them quickly. Until then, sell yourself as enthusiastic, hardworking, ethical and available, with support from a great brokerage and colleagues when you need assistance.

4. You are now a business.

Project your expenses for the year and your net if you do five sales in the first year, at the average residential selling price in your board area. Do a budget. Don’t spend money you have not made. Set up files, keep receipts. Remit taxes at source, HST and personal income tax. It is not your money and never will be. You do not want to be hounded by the CRA.

5. You are your own administrator.

Create an excellent calendar and keep a log. Write down everything you are doing in your business. Track where your time is going and what is bringing you success. Where are your leads coming from? What isn’t working for you?

6. You are your own PR department.

Write down the names and contact information of everyone you know and create a database. Grow your sphere of influence. Let everyone you meet know you are in real estate and ask them if they have a trusted real estate advisor, or if they would they consider working with you. Email or snail mail some information of value to your database at least once every quarter.

7. Project that you need to talk to 100 people about real estate before you get one firm transaction.

This doesn’t include friends and family, who may or may not want to do business with you. If you want to do 10 transactions this year, you need to talk to 1,000 people about what you do. If you don’t believe this, start counting.

8. Do 100 open houses this year.

Yes, 100. That is your magic number. It could be one or two or four a weekend. It could be some weeknights or non-traditional times. Try various times and see what works for you. If you don’t like open houses, go door-knocking. You need to talk to people face to face about real estate.

Don’t just do 100 open houses, do 100 great open houses. Quantity isn’t enough. Learn which agents have properties where you can host an open house and introduce yourself. Develop an open house plan for yourself, a system, to make sure you are well informed about the house, the neighbourhood amenities, recent neighbourhood sales and new listings. Preview the property. Spend two hours of prep time for each hour of every open house. Show the listing agent you are organized and committed. Arrive at least 15 minutes before you open – be there before the buyers! Treat each open house like a job interview. You are looking to find a buyer or a seller who will “hire” you.

9. Do floor time, duty.

Yes, it is boring to sit in the office waiting for someone to call, but many agents don’t show up so there is real opportunity here. It might not amount to a lot, but it gives you a chance to talk to more people about real estate. Study pricing or neighbourhoods while you are waiting for the phone to ring, not YouTube videos of cat capers. But don’t only do duty and don’t do it on weekend afternoons when you should be doing open houses.

10. Go to your weekly sales meeting and agent tour, if your brokerage offers it.

See as many houses as you can. Study the pricing, listen to what other agents are saying about the listing, research how the agent might have come up with the list price. Watch how much it sells for. You need to see a lot of houses before you can become good at pricing. Research neighbourhoods. Every week, study a new neighbourhood. Drive around, walk around. Learn amenities, schools, parks and places of worship. Study typical home styles. Study pricing history of that neighbourhood for the last 12 months. Next week, do the same for another neighbourhood. Next week, do it again, until you know the whole city this way.

And show up. The first few weeks can be very discouraging. Keep on with the basics. After awhile of doing the core things over and over again, something will take hold. You will find your niche, your best way of engaging with clients, and you can build on that. But it won’t happen if you don’t show up. You are a million times more likely to pick up a duty call if you are at the office than if you are sitting at home or hanging out around town.

A key tool for successful realtors is a real estate CRM. A CRM can be a game-changer when it comes to contact management, as it contains all your client contact profiles, can be setup with automated email and e-newsletter campaigns, and has reminders for your clients special events so that you’re always in-the-know! Try IXACT Contact real estate CRM. IXACT Contact offers Rookie Realtors a 6 month FREE trial! Sign up today and kick-start your new business!

 

“Sales Book for Terms Deals Presentations” on Bundlr

Reference Book – A Real Estate Guide

* Please note, format and page numbers differ from the printed version. The printed version will be available for purchase after January 5, 2011. To purchase a copy, submit a Publications Request (RE 350) . The chapters of the Reference Book below are in PDF format. You will need Adobe Reader to view them.

Reference Book

  • Introduction
    Cover, Preface, Location of Department of Real Estate Offices, Past Real Estate Commissioners, A Word of Caution
  • Chapter 1 – The California Department of Real Estate
    Government Regulation of Brokerage Transactions, Original Real Estate Broker License, Corporate Real Estate License, Original Salesperson License, License Renewals – Brokers and Salespersons, Other License Information, Continuing Education, Miscellaneous Information, Prepaid Residential Listing Service License, Enforcement of Real Estate Law, Discrimination, Notice of Discriminatory Restrictions, Subdivisions, Department Publications, Recovery Account
  • Chapter 2 – The Real Estate License Examinations
    Scope of Examination, Preparing for an Exam, Exam Construction, Examination Weighting, Exam Outline, Exam Rules – Exam Subversion, Materials, Question Construction, Multiple Choice Exam, Q and A Analysis, Sample Multiple Choice Items
  • Chapter 3 – Trade and Professional Associations
    Real Estate Associations and Boards, Related Associations, Ethics
  • Chapter 4 – Property
    Historical Derivations, The Modern View, Personal Property, Fixtures, Legal Difference Between Real and Personal Property, Land Descriptions, Other Description Methods
  • Chapter 5 – Title to Real Property
    California Adopts a Recording System, Ownership of Real Property, Separate Ownership, Concurrent Ownership, Tenancy in Partnership, Encumbrances, Mechanic’s Liens, Design Professional’s Lien, Attachments and Judgments, Easements, Restrictions, Encroachments, Homestead Exemption, Assuring Marketability of Title
  • Chapter 6 – Transfer of Interests in Real Property
    Contracts in General, Essential Elements of a Contract, Statute of Frauds, Interpretation, Performance and Discharge of Contracts, Real Estate Contracts, Acquisition and Transfer of Real Estate
  • Chapter 7 – Principal Instruments of Transfer
    A Backward Look, the Pattern Today, Deeds in General, Types of Deeds
  • Chapter 8 – Escrow
    Definition, Essential Elements, Escrow Holder, Instructions, Complete Escrow, General Escrow Principles, General Escrow Procedures, Proration, Termination, Cancellation of Escrow – Cancellation of Purchase Contract, Who May Act As Escrow Agent, Audit, Prohibited Conduct, Relationship of Real Estate Broker and the Escrow Holder, Designating the Escrow Holder, Developer Controlled Escrows – Prohibition
  • Chapter 9 – Landlord and Tenant
    Types of Leasehold Estates, Dual Legal Nature of Lease, Verbal and Written Agreements, Lease Ingredients, Contract and Conveyance Issues, Rights and Obligations of Parties to a Lease, Condemnation of Leased Property, Notice Upon Tenant Default, Non-Waivable Tenant Rights, Remedies of Landlord, Disclosures by Owner or Rental Agent to Tenant
  • Chapter 10 – Agency
    Introduction, Creation of Agency Relationships, Authority of Agent, Duties Owed to Principals, Duties Owed to Third Parties, Rights of Agent, Termination of Agency, Special Brokerage Relationships, Licensee Acting for Own Account, Unlawful Employment and Compensation, Broker-Salesperson Relationship, Conclusion
  • Chapter 11 – Impact of the Penal Code and Other Statutes
    Penal Code, Unlawful Practice of Law, Business and Professions Code, Civil Code, Corporations Code
  • Chapter 12 – Real Estate Finance
    Background, The Economy, The Mortgage Market, Overview of the Loan Process, Details of the Loan Process, Federal and State Disclosure and Notice of Rights, Promissory Notes, Trust Deeds and Mortgages, Junior Trust Deeds and Mortgages, Other Types of Mortgage and Trust Deed Loans, Alternative Financing, Effects of Security, Due on Sale, Lender’s Remedy in Case of Default, Basic Interest Rate Mathematics, The Tools of Analysis
  • Chapter 13 – Non-Mortgage Alternatives To Real Estate Financing
    Syndicate Equity Financing, Commercial Loan, Bonds or Stocks, Long-Term Lease, Exchange, Sale-Leaseback, Sales Contract (Land Contract), Security Agreements (Personal Property)
  • Chapter 14 – Real Estate Syndicates and Investment Trusts
    Real Estate Syndication, Real Estate Investment Trusts
  • Chapter 15 – Appraisal and Valuation
    Theoretical Concepts of Value and Definitions, Principles of Valuation, Basic Valuation Definitions, Forces Influencing Value, Economic Trends Affecting Real Estate Value, Site Analysis and Valuation, Architectural Styles and Functional Utility, The Appraisal Process and Methods, Methods of Appraising Properties, The Sales Comparison Approach, Cost Approach, Depreciation, Income (Capitalization) Approach, Income Approach Process, Income Approach Applied, Residual Techniques, Yield Capitalization Analysis, Gross Rent Multiplier, Summary, Appraisal of Manufactured Homes (Mobilehomes), Evaluating the Single Family Residence and Small Multi-Family Dwellings, Typical Outline for Writing the Single Family Residence Narrative Appraisal Report, Conclusion, Additional Practice Problems, The Office of Real Estate Appraisers (OREA)
  • Chapter 16 – Taxation and Assessments
    Property Taxes, Taxation of Mobilehomes, Special Assessments, Certain Assessment Statutes, Federal Taxes, Documentary Transfer Tax, State Taxes, Miscellaneous Taxes, Acquisition of Real Property, Income Taxation
  • Chapter 17 – Subdivisions and Other Public Controls
    Basic Subdivision Laws, Subdivision Definitions, Functions in Land Subdivision, Compliance and Governmental Consultation, Types of Subdivisions, Compliance With Subdivided Lands Law, Handling of Purchasers’ Deposit Money, Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, Additional Provisions, Grounds For Denial of Public Report, Subdivision Map Act, Preliminary Planning Considerations, Basic Steps in Final Map Preparation and Approval, Types of Maps, Tentative Map Preparation, Tentative Map Filing, Final Map, Parcel Map, Other Public Controls, Health and Sanitation, Eminent Domain, Water Conservation and Flood Control, Interstate Land Sales Full Disclosure Act
  • Chapter 18 – Planning, Zoning, and Redevelopment
    The Need For Planning, General Plans, Redevelopment
  • Chapter 19 – Brokerage
    Brokerage as a Part of the Real Estate Business, Other Specialists, Operations, Office Size – Management, Office Size, Career Building, The Broker and the New Salesperson, Specialization, A Broker’s Related Pursuits, Professionalism, Mobilehome Sales
  • Chapter 20 – Contract Provisions and Disclosures in a Residential Real Estate Transaction
    A Basic Transaction, A Basic Listing, Purchase Contract/Receipt of Deposit, Disclosures
  • Chapter 21 – Trust Funds
    General Information, Trust Fund Bank Accounts, Accounting Records, Other Accounting Systems and Records, Recording Process, Reconciliation of Accounting Records, Documentation Requirements, Additional Documentation Requirements, Audits and Examinations, Sample Transactions, Questions and Answers Regarding Trust Fund Requirements and Record Keeping, Summary, Exhibits
  • Chapter 22 – Property Management
    Professional Organization, Property Managers and Professional Designations, Functions of a Property Manager, Specific Duties of the Property Manager, Earnings, Accounting Records For Property Management
  • Chapter 23 – Developers of Land and Buildings
    Subdividing, Developer-Builder, Home Construction
  • Chapter 24 – Business Opportunities
    Definition, Agency, Small Businesses and the Small Business Administration, Form of Business Organization, Form of Sale, Why an Escrow?, Buyer’s Evaluation, Motives of Buyers and Sellers, Counseling the Buyer, Satisfying Government Agencies, Listings, Preparing the Listing, Establishing Value, Valuation Methods, Lease, Goodwill, Fictitious Business Name, Franchising, Bulk Sales and the Uniform Commercial Code, California Sales and Use Tax Provisions, Alcoholic Beverage Control Act
  • Chapter 25 – Mineral, Oil and Gas Brokerage
    History, Mineral, Oil and Gas Brokerage, 1994 – No Separate License Requirements
  • Chapter 26 – Tables, Formulas, and Measurements
  • Chapter 27 – Glossary

Nothing can kill a sale faster than a dated, closed-in kitchen area. Many of today’s buyers see the kitchen as the home’s command center, and not just a place for cooking and eating. They want the kitchen to be many things at once, hence the rise in popularity of what is known as the multifunctional open-concept kitchen.

Read more: 9 Modest Fixes for the Problem Kitchen

If your clients are looking to renovate an existing kitchen, or you need to advise them on building one that’s brand-new, the Washington Post shared some background on how they can design a kitchen space so that it’s functional in many different way.

“Whether you are renovating existing structure or building new, architects fully recognize the need for space that is designed for movement and flow,” says Stephanie Brick, senior designer at Sustainable Design Group, in Gaithersburg, Md. “There are still rules and important elemental guidelines — you do not want to just delete all of the walls on your first floor. But by being selective in the design, materials and professionals you work with, you can easily achieve a space that does not merely react to, but anticipates, your bustling lifestyle.”

The two main considerations when designing a multifunctional space are wall placement and storage. While it may seem like an easy solution to knock down walls, Brick says there are other architectural solutions, like open doorways, that can give a similar effect while keeping the space architecturally interesting.

Being as honest as possible about individual organizational and storage needs is key when creating a multifunctional kitchen. For some owners who want to use the kitchen as a makeshift homework area or as a place to handle their bills, adding storage for these needs will be necessary. If your clients do a lot of cooking and entertaining for large groups, they will want to make sure the kitchen has space and storage to accommodate that process. If the family has small children, the kitchen can be designed with their safety in mind.

Brick has one final piece of advice when designing this type of kitchen space. “Honesty with your architect is key to creating a strong working relationship and delivering an equally beautiful and functional space in your home.”

Source: “How to create a live/work/play space at home,” The Washington Post (June 8, 2016)

via Now Trending: The Multifunctional Kitchen | Realtor Magazine


“Sales Book for Terms Deals Presentations” on Bundlr

In that the last two years I have attended at least 10 tradeshows for real estate and met at least hundreds of people. One thing that always amazes me is the lack of follow-up in real estate. Out of all those trade shows I have attended, and you know which ones, the ones where you drop your card in a bowl in the hopes of winning the beach towel or basket of wine, and of all those places I have had maybe 5 companies contact me from dropping my card in. This has always blown my mind. Companies spend a lot of money to have the booth, buy the marketing materials for display and handout, and the gift, just to throw away those business cards?

So, why is this? Why do companies do this? I will tell you one reason and that is the people that staff these booths are rarely commissioned people, but salary people. This is like asking your McDonald’s employees to bring in more business.

Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with salaried people, that is needed for a lot of job functions, but, when you put salaried people in charge of following up with potential clients, you get the kind of response I have experienced.

A second reason is business owners just do not get it. I know some of these booths are manned by the actual owners. Surely, they will follow up right? WRONG! Business owners are usually too busy putting out fires and being reactive to actually conduct proactive marketing tactics. They spend the money on the booth, maybe get a new client or two, and stop at that.

So, how can you be more effective at networking and follow-up? First of all, if you run a booth, within 48 hours you should be TOUCHING those people that dropped their card off. Now, I don’t mean physically touching, I mean calling, faxing or emailing them. You do this in a non-threatening way by saying something along the lines of:

“Thanks for stopping by my booth, I hope you had a fantastic time! I did want to let you know that my company does XXXXX, and if you are ever in need of my services, please feel free to call or email me personally, and I would be more than happy to take care of you. Also, if you would like to be on our free email distribution list, simply reply back with the word “ADD” and I will get your on our preferred client email list!”

You do have an email list right? You should. I have had people buy houses from me that were on my list for over a year and told me they had been waiting for the right opportunity.

One more way to be more effective with follow-up is don’t go shoving your beautiful business card that you spent a lot of money on in everyone’s face. When you talk to someone, be sure to get theirs, THEN, if they ask you for one, give them yours. See, if you get theirs, you control the communication, you shoot them an email they next day saying it was nice to meet them, not wait for them to possibly email or call you.

Just a couple tips to increase your business!

About the Author: Ray Higdon is owner of RLH Holdings (www.buyahousefromray.com ), a wholesale investing company in Southwest Florida. Ray works with investors to get deals closed. Ray also speaks on Sales and Real Estate Investing. You can reach Ray at ray.higdon@gmail.com

RLH Holdings, LLC
Cell: 239-248-2182  E-mail: ray.higdon@gmail.com