Archives For Selling Houses

Looking to make the most of your open houses? The following three tips can help up your open house game.

  1. Digitize

For REALTORS® who want to enhance the Open House experience for prospects and bolster their own system for capturing leads, Open Home Pro fits the bill. An excellent alternative to paper sign-in sheets, this free download offers users the ability to create a comprehensive digital experience for prospects through sign-in forms, photo displays, customized questions, and automated thank you messages.

No more wasted time trying to decipher handwritten sign-in sheets that offer little other than a name and email. Based on your customized questions, this innovative program will send you a list of leads who don’t have an agent or have a home to sell, or who are pre-approved for a mortgage. Open Home Pro also allows users to easily export collected data to a CSV file.

  1. Deliver

Handouts make great icebreakers and takeaways at any Open House, and Realtors Property Resource® (RPR®) makes it easy to create them. The real estate data platform offers REALTORS® several customizable reports perfectly suited for Open Houses. Start by offering an RPR Property Flyer. Branded with your name and contact info, the flyer offers just enough data about the property to give clients a solid understanding of its attributes, including photos and insights on how you came to the list price via comps.

Two of RPR’s flagship reports seen frequently at Open Houses are their Neighborhood and School Reports. The Neighborhood Report presents an in-depth portrait of the people who live in a target area, in addition to key economic and quality of life indicators. The report also includes median list and sales prices, listings and sales volumes, and per square foot pricing on sold homes.

Similarly, RPR’s School Report report summarizes student populations, testing outcomes, parental reviews, and ratings about a public or private school. Must-have information for parents.

Here’s a tip: Print a few of these insightful reports to showcase on a kitchen table and when the supply dwindles, ask potential buyers for an email address. From that spot, use your tablet or phone to retrieve your saved reports from the RPR website and send it to the client in just a few quick clicks.

  1. Drip

Another radically simple idea for converting leads to clients post-Open House is to create a homes by email campaign. Here agents can send newly listed homes to prospects via an automated delivery system offered through their MLS. When a home is listed that meets your client’s specific criteria (location, square footage, number of bedrooms, price), the listing is automatically delivered to the client, complete with your personalized greeting. This type of drip campaign will keep your client in the loop and requires little to no effort on your part.

For more information, visit www.narrpr.com.

Thursday, 2 Jun 2016 | 9:26 AM ET

It looks so easy on TV. Buy a bargain-basement house, pull up some nasty carpet, re-tile the bathroom, paint away the wall stains and sell it for a hefty profit.

It’s not, however, all those popular shows that are driving the flipping market today. It’s pure and simple prices — and profit. There is a severe lack of good quality, turn-key homes for sale, and that has created a seller’s market across the nation, even for those reselling homes.

After cooling off in 2014, home flipping is on the rise again — its share of all home sales is up 20 percent in the first three months of this year from the previous quarter and up 3 percent from the same period a year ago, according to a new report from RealtyTrac, which defines a flip as a property bought and resold within a 12-month period.

While flipping today is nothing like it was during the housing boom a decade ago, when investors used risky mortgages, it is reaching new peaks in 7 percent of the nation’s metro markets, including Baltimore, Buffalo, New Orleans, San Diego and even pricey Seattle.

Dana Rice, real estate agent and home flipper, at her latest project in Bethesda, Maryland, a very small colonial, within walking distance to shops and Metro.

Diana Olick | CNBC
Dana Rice, real estate agent and home flipper, at her latest project in Bethesda, Maryland, a very small colonial, within walking distance to shops and Metro.

“While responsible home flipping is helpful for a housing market, excessive and irresponsible flipping activity can contribute to a home price pressure cooker that overheats a housing market, and we are starting to see evidence of that pressure cooker environment in a handful of markets,” said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at RealtyTrac.

That’s because flippers today largely use cash — 71 percent did in the first quarter of this year. Compare that to just 27 percent who used cash at the height of the housing boom. That helps keep most flippers conservative, but it also exacerbates the problems for entry-level homebuyers, who are facing one of the tightest housing markets in history. They simply can’t compete against all-cash buyers.

Usually flippers look for distressed properties either in the foreclosure process or already bank-owned. These are not always listed on public sale sites. There are fewer of those today, so flippers are moving to the mainstream market, creating that new pressure.

“A telltale sign is when flippers are acquiring properties at or close to full market value. Those markets are so competitive that even the off-market properties flippers are looking to buy are not selling at much of a discount — and there may be very few distressed properties available,” said Blomquist.

Examples of these markets include San Antonio, where Blomquist says flippers are actually purchasing at a 7.8 percent premium above estimated full market value, as well as Austin, Texas; Salt Lake City; Naples, Florida; Dallas and San Jose, California.

Despite the premium to buy, flippers are still seeing growing gains in profit. Home flippers realized an average gross profit of more than $58,000 in the first quarter of this year, the highest since the third quarter of 2005, according to RealtyTrac.

Real estate agent Dana Rice and her husband flip houses in the tony D.C. suburb of Bethesda, Maryland. Prices there are well above the national median, and there are few distressed properties. Instead, they target old, small fixer-uppers. Even those command a hefty purchase price up front, but they can also offer big rewards.

“I didn’t want a teardown. There is so much character in this part of Bethesda,” said Rice. “I don’t think that everybody wants a brand new build. There is a hole in the market because not everyone wants to do a renovation. If you put a little bit of effort in, these numbers can be huge.”

Rice purchased her latest project, a very small colonial, within walking distance to shops and Metro, for $680,000. She expects to put half a million dollars into the renovation, adding both square footage and high-end finishings; she is confident that in this competitive market she will see an 18-25 percent return on investment.

“It’s like birthing a baby. … If you’re overpriced, you’re dead in the water.” -Dana Rice, real estate agent and home flipper

“It’s like birthing a baby,” she said, noting that she will wait to list it until she feels the market is just right. “If you’re overpriced, you’re dead in the water.”

The lack of inventory is certainly a double-edged sword for flippers. Their initial investment price can be high, and flippers are often competing against local builders, who may want to tear the house down and put something up that is twice the size. On the other hand, not everyone wants or can afford a huge, new, expensive home, and that gives flippers the edge.

“The key here is that there is particularly a dearth of listed inventory in good condition,” said Blomquist. “That is the inventory flippers are competing against when they sell.”

Web Sites For Selling Your Properties

1.Fsbo.com

2.Fsbosellbuy.com

3.Forsalebyownercenter.com

4.Ushomeassist.com

5.Isoldmyhouse.com

6.Owners.com

7.Homesbyowner.com

8.Craigslist.org (Use all cities within 150 miles of your property.You’d be surprised how far people will travel to buy retail and wholesale).

9.Ebay.com

10.Propbot.com

11.Creonline.com (check out their real estate clubs section which will give you a list of all the real estate clubs within your given city).

12.Oodle.com

13.Thecreativeinvestor.com

14.Trulia.com

15.Sellhomeshere.com

16.Dealmakerscafe.com

17.Totalrealestatesolutions.com

18.Propertysites.com

19.Privateforsale.com

20.Homeportfoliojunction.com

21.Repus.net

22.Realestate.yahoo.com

23.Realestate.aol.com

24.Listingofhomes.com

25.Realestate.msn.com

26.Privatesalereaty.com

27.Domesticsale.com

28.Fsboamerica.org

29.Zillow.com

30.Tourmeonline.com

31.Housevalues.com

32.Fromhomeowner.com

33.Fsbo.net

34.Virtualfsbo.com

35.Fastrealestate.net

36.Realtor.com

37.Backpage.com

38.Edgeio.com

39.Fsboi.net

40.Fsbolocal.com

41.Homes-for-sale-by-owner.info

42.Thehomelist.com

43.Talking properties.com

44.Shopdreamhouse.com

45.Buyowner.com

46.Fsbodepoe.com

47.Wantedtosell.com

48.Ushx.com

49.Realtymadeeasy.com

50.Postyourpad.com

51.Livedeal.com

52.Allstatesfsbo.com

53.Base.google.com

54.Fsbogorilla.com

55.Homesalez.com

56.Realestatemate.com

57.Real-estate-byowner.com

58.Homesellnetwork.com

59.Reachbuyers.com

60.Ownerwillcarry.com

61.Kijiji.com

62.Creiaonline.com

63.Olx.com

64.Fsboads.com

65.Virtualfsbo.com

66.Fsbon.com

67.Byowners365.net

68.Neorealestate.com

69.Byowner.com

70.Forsalebyowner.com

Nothing can kill a sale faster than a dated, closed-in kitchen area. Many of today’s buyers see the kitchen as the home’s command center, and not just a place for cooking and eating. They want the kitchen to be many things at once, hence the rise in popularity of what is known as the multifunctional open-concept kitchen.

Read more: 9 Modest Fixes for the Problem Kitchen

If your clients are looking to renovate an existing kitchen, or you need to advise them on building one that’s brand-new, the Washington Post shared some background on how they can design a kitchen space so that it’s functional in many different way.

“Whether you are renovating existing structure or building new, architects fully recognize the need for space that is designed for movement and flow,” says Stephanie Brick, senior designer at Sustainable Design Group, in Gaithersburg, Md. “There are still rules and important elemental guidelines — you do not want to just delete all of the walls on your first floor. But by being selective in the design, materials and professionals you work with, you can easily achieve a space that does not merely react to, but anticipates, your bustling lifestyle.”

The two main considerations when designing a multifunctional space are wall placement and storage. While it may seem like an easy solution to knock down walls, Brick says there are other architectural solutions, like open doorways, that can give a similar effect while keeping the space architecturally interesting.

Being as honest as possible about individual organizational and storage needs is key when creating a multifunctional kitchen. For some owners who want to use the kitchen as a makeshift homework area or as a place to handle their bills, adding storage for these needs will be necessary. If your clients do a lot of cooking and entertaining for large groups, they will want to make sure the kitchen has space and storage to accommodate that process. If the family has small children, the kitchen can be designed with their safety in mind.

Brick has one final piece of advice when designing this type of kitchen space. “Honesty with your architect is key to creating a strong working relationship and delivering an equally beautiful and functional space in your home.”

Source: “How to create a live/work/play space at home,” The Washington Post (June 8, 2016)

via Now Trending: The Multifunctional Kitchen | Realtor Magazine

Seller Financing

In some situations, sellers are lining Lending Standards, Seller Financing. CFPB
Finalizes Loan 2013, The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
www.realtor.org/topics/seller-financing – 2012-03-15

Seller Financing May Be Worth Exploring | Realtor Magazine

In today’s stymied real estate market, lenders are more cautious about making loans and sellers are more inclined to agree to carry financing to sell their properties more quickly. Here’s a look at how installment sales could work for your clients.
realtormag.realtor.org/law-and-ethics/law/article/2008/12/seller-financing-may-be-worth-exploring – 2008-12-01

Get Seller Financing to Work for You | Realtor Magazine

Seller financing has been a hot issue in recent real estate news due to the changes in regulations, specifically in the Dodd-Frank Act. Here’s what you need to know to incorporate this method into your business strategy and be the best advocate for your clients.
realtormag.realtor.org/law-and-ethics/feature/article/2015/04/get-seller-financing-work-for-you – 2015-04-06

Seller Financing: Background

Seller financing is subject to new rules following the passage of financial reform legislation. Know these changes in order to serve sellers better.
www.realtor.org/topics/seller-financing/background – 2012-01-17

My Account

Seller financing plays an important role in financing the sale of real estate, especially when credit is tight. This paper summarizes the impact of two federal laws that affect seller financing. Seller financing plays an important role in financing the sale of real estate, especially when credit is tight. This paper summarizes the impact of two federal laws that affect seller financing.
www.realtor.org/reports/seller-financing-impact-of-the-safe-act-and-the-dodd-frank-act – 2012-01-12

Sales Clinic: Expand Your Market with Seller Financing | Realtor Magazine

Are there any creative ways to sell a home that will maximize the salesperson’s value? —Timothy Baker, RE/MAX Affiliates, Naperville, Illinois If you want to be a top salesperson, you always have to be on the lookout for new and creative ideas to set yourself apart from the pack.
realtormag.realtor.org/…/feature/article/1999/12/sales-clinic-expand-your-market-seller-financing – 1999-12-01

Ways to Protect Yourself Under Seller Financing | Realtor Magazine

TIP: Instead of taking back an installment loan, per se, have the buyer purchase an annuity or some zero-coupon bonds in your name. These can often be bought at deep discounts to eventual payout, lowering the sale price, but guaranteeing you a higher future return.
realtormag.realtor.org/…/sell-your-business/article/ways-protect-yourself-under-seller-financing

NAR Submits Comments on CFPB’s Proposed Seller Financing Rules

On Oct. 15, 2012, NAR President submitted comments to the CFPB on its loan originator proposed rule. On Oct. 15, 2012, NAR President submitted comments to the CFPB on its loan originator proposed rule.
www.realtor.org/articles/nar-submits-comments-on-cfpbs-proposed-seller-financing-rules – 2012-10-19

Sellers Can Fill a Void | Realtor Magazine

If you’re working with sellers who have seen offers collapse because buyers can’t get a mortgage loan, you might want to suggest they consider offering some variation of seller financing.
realtormag.realtor.org/law-and-ethics/law/article/2011/07/sellers-can-fill-void – 2011-07-01

Seller Financing: The SAFE Act

In 2008, President Bush signed the Secure and Fair Enforcement of Mortgage Licensing Act or SAFE Act, which requires licensing and registration of loan originators.
www.realtor.org/topics/seller-financing/the-safe-act – 2012-03-15
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Looking for something else? Search the archive for many resources created before 2009.

 

Field Guide to Lease-Option Purchases

(Updated April 2016)

Lease-option agreements* are common when acquiring personal property—such as dishwashers, washing machines, automobiles, and TVs—but are not as common for the acquisition of real property. Lease-option agreements are generally utilized in residential real estate acquisition when a home buyer would like to purchase a home, but needs to repair her credit rating in order to secure a promissory note and mortgage. The lease-option agreement allows a buyer to lease a property for a set period of time—typically between 1-3 years—with the option to buy the property at a contractual future date. “The negotiated option is typically a percentage of the price for example, one to five percent, and is credited, along with the rents and a rent premium, to the purchase price if the lessee buys the property. If the option to buy is not exercised, the buyer will lose the option fee and rent premium.” (Real Estate Law (link is external), p. 227). Read the articles below to learn more about this alternative real estate financing option. (H. Hester, Information and Digitization Specialist)

*Also known as lease-to-own, rent-to-own, lease/purchase, lease with an option to purchase, or real options.


E – EBSCO articles available for NAR members only. Password can be found on the EBSCO Access Information page.


Lease to Own: The Basics

Is rent-to-own the future of housing? (link is external), (HousingWire, Jan. 14, 2016).

Investors Bank on Rent-to-Own Comeback (REALTOR® Magazine, July 29, 2015).

How do Lease Purchase Agreements Work? (link is external) (SFGate, n.d.).

How Do I Get a List of Rent to Own Homes? (link is external) (realtor.com®, July 25, 2012).

How Do I Find A Rent To Own Home In Bristol, Pennsylvania? (link is external) (realtor.com®, May 10, 2012).

How Do I Find A Realtor To Explain The Rent To Own Option? (link is external) (realtor.com®, Apr. 6, 2012).

Lease-to-Own Contracts (link is external), (UCLA School of Law, 2012).

Lease options are back: proceed carefully (link is external), (Realty Times, Oct. 25, 2011).

Sale-Leaseback Transactions: Price Premiums and Market Efficiency (link is external), (Journal of Real Estate Research, Apr.-June 2010). E

Informal Homeownership in the United States and the Law (link is external), see page 132. (University of Texas School of Law, 2010).

How lease-options benefit sellers, buyers … and their REALTORS®? (link is external), (CRE Online, n.d.).

Thought about lease-to-own transactions?, (REALTOR® Magazine – Speaking of Real Estate blog, Aug. 6, 2009).

Renting to Own (link is external), (realtor.com®, n.d.)

Case Studies & Examples

A Valuation Framework for Rent-to-Own Housing Contracts (link is external), (The Appraisal Journal, Summer 2014). E

Lease-to-own deals offer options in sluggish Tampa Bay housing market (link is external), (St. Petersburg Times, Oct. 23, 2011).

Can I get a lease option with bad credit? (link is external), (realtor.com®, May 5, 2011).

A Growing Housing Imbalance (link is external), (Mortgage Banking, Oct. 2011). E

Raising Capital Through Sale-Leasebacks (link is external), (Public Management, June 2010). E

Tax Implications

Individual Taxation Developments (link is external), (The Tax Adviser, Mar. 2012). E

Comparing Accounting and Taxation for Leases: Certified Public Accountant (link is external), (The CPA Journal, Apr. 2009). E

Tax Considerations for Buying and Selling Property with a Burdensome Lease (link is external), (Journal of Accountancy, 2009). E

Government Publications & Programs

State Agency Lease/Purchase Program (link is external), (Washington State Treasurer’s Office, n.d.).

Recent State Agency Lease/Purchase Interest Rates – Real Estate Only (link is external) (Washington State Treasurer’s Office, n.d.).

Definition from Washington State:

Lease/Purchase Obligations (Real Estate) — Lease/purchase obligations are contracts entered into by the state which provide for the use and purchase of real or personal property, and provide for payment by the state over a term of more than one year. For reference, see RCW chapter 39.94 “Financing Contracts.” Lease/purchase obligations are one type of lease-development alternative.” (Financial Budget Instructions Glossary of Terms (link is external), Washington State Office of Financial Management, n.d.).

Non-Mortgage Alternatives to RE Financing (link is external) from Reference Book – A Real Estate Guide (link is external), (California Department of Real Estate, 2010).

LFC Hearing Brief (link is external), (New Mexico Legislative Finance Committee, Dec. 2007).

Instructions for the Lease/Purchase Analysis Modeling Tool (link is external), (Idaho State Leasing Dept. of Administration, n.d.).

eBooks & Other Resources

The following eBooks and digital audiobooks are available to NAR members:

eBooks.realtor.org

Smart Guide to Real Estate: Step by Step Rent to Own, (Kindle and ePub)

Investing in Rent-to-Own Property, 2010 (ePub)

Investing in Real Estate With Lease Options and “Subject to” Deals, 2005 (ePub)

Books, Videos, Research Reports & More

The resources below are available for loan through Information Services. Up to three books, tapes, CDs and/or DVDs can be borrowed for 30 days from the Library for a nominal fee of $10. Call Information Services at 800-874-6500 for assistance.

Who Says You Can’t Buy a Home! (link is external) HG 2040.5 R25w (2006).

Field Guides & More

These field guides and other resources in the Virtual Library may also be of interest:

Sale-Leasebacks & Synthetic Leases

Seller Financing

Information Services Blog

Have an Idea for a New Field Guide?

Send us your suggestions (link sends e-mail).

The inclusion of links on this field guide does not imply endorsement by the National Association of REALTORS®. NAR makes no representations about whether the content of any external sites which may be linked in this field guide complies with state or federal laws or regulations or with applicable NAR policies. These links are provided for your convenience only and you rely on them at your own risk.

from Marcie Geffner

Staging a home for millennial buyers: Don’t make it look like Grandma’s house

Most buyers want a home that’s light, bright and sparkling clean. Millennials, the generation born from 1980 to 1995, also want a home that’s move-in ready, modernized and furnished with all the colors and comforts of a Pottery Barn store.

“No millennial wants to buy Grandma’s house,” says Melinda Bartling, a home stager and Realtor at Keller Williams Partners in Overland Park, Kansas. “And a lot of them don’t want to buy their parents’ house. It needs to be hip. It needs to be fresh.”

Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/real-estate/staging-a-home-for-millennial-buyers.aspx#ixzz4AZFEpddj
Follow us: @Bankrate on Twitter | Bankrate on Facebook

Home Buying Tips

October 20, 2006 — Leave a comment

Step-by-Step Home Buying

Buying Hints & Insights

Submitted by Professionals

Home Selling Tips

October 15, 2006 — Leave a comment

Step-by-Step Home Selling

Home Selling Hints & Insights

Submitted by Professionals